A Beginning & An End

A Beginning & An End

Last night the Short + Sweet Theatre season wrapped for it’s tenth and last time.

I have wanted to direct a piece for Short + Sweet for years, and this year I finally got up the courage to apply. It’s been my first foray into directing solo, and I definitely felt both ready and terrified. In previous projects I have always had another person, who often had the big vision, and I just helped polish and support that vision. But this time it was all on me (well me and the actors).

Luckily the piece I chose demanded simplicity, which is definitely my jam. Just two people on stage playing and emoting with each other. I was so lucky to have two stellar actors in Raluca Botezan and Trajano Leydet, to take this new adventure with me. And their hearts shone brightly on that stage

I learnt a hell of a lot doing this. My main takeaway after watching all the weird and wonderful pieces we shared the stage with was that I have a lot to learn, but also a lot to give. It’s definitely only a beginning of my directing journey.

I am really sad that this is the last year of Short + Sweet. I only got to participate in it twice. The first time in 2013 as a performer where we did a weird, physical theatre devised piece that stuck out like a sore thumb amongst what was mostly ‘popcorn comedies’. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good popcorn comedy, but more and more look for my theatre experience to have a deeper meaning, even if it told through humor. 

This year, a week ago, when I watched the other plays, alongside ours, I was blown away. It seems that other theatre makers in Auckland are on the same wavelength - making art about things that really matter. There were some beautiful pieces that explored some really deep themes: connection, fertility, friendship, family, gender. I was so privileged for our piece to share the stage with them, and humbled by the talent and soulful stories being told. I think it makes me really excited about the art that is being made in this city at the moment.

-Prema Cottingham


Make It Unmissable.

Make It Unmissable.

It wasn’t that long ago that my mentor, Kacie Stetson, pointed out that I needed to change my narrative.

And she wasn’t wrong. The narrative that’s been in my head was helpful when Morgan and I first founded Navi. The narrative went something like this, “You’re an immigrant here, no one knows you, and they (the arts scene) don’t make it easy for someone new to get amongst it and become known.” I wasn’t wrong. We weren’t wrong. The feeling that no one would let us in and that we didn’t want to wait for “permission” to make art here in Auckland is what pushed Navi into existence, but Navi is turning five years old soon and I am six years an immigrant… as Kacie pointed out, it’s time to change the narrative.

I started that process by identifying the artists/companies that have something going on that I would like for Navi and then I sat down and emailed them. That was step one towards changing my narrative/forming a new narrative which at the moment goes something like this, “People will want to talk to you and get to know Navi if you give them a chance. You are not an outsider. We are not outsiders.” I wasn’t wrong. Within a very short amount of time three generous creatives: Ahi Karunaharan (Actor, Director, Dramaturg, Producer, Writer), Justin Lewis (Indian Ink), and Miles Gregory (The Pop-Up Globe) all came back with an invitation to talk. From each of those conversations I learned so much and I left each chat blessed by the generosity of each person. Here were three well established and busy theatre makers who gave up an hour or more of their busy schedules to tell me a bit about their journeys in the arts, share some of what they have learned with me, and to encourage me in my own artistic adventures; those were invaluable conversations for myself and Navi.

There was so much in those conversations that I would love to share but I would need to write a long form essay to do that, so I will share one piece of advice that has been buzzing in my head since Friday. “If you are going to make something, make it UNMISSABLE.” Miles Gregory challenged me and inspired me with his one half business practical one half creative maverick approach to making theatre that I am still digesting, and I hope those words will inspire you as well. From Ahi’s love of the arts community here in Auckland and his passion for new works, to Justin Lewis’s NZ arts savvy tour making magic, to Miles Gregory’s studied and inspired way of making art that is both engaging and ticket selling…I have much to dwell on and lots of new narratives to consider.

For now, let’s all get out there and make something UNMISSABLE!

-Dawn

Forward Facing

Forward Facing

We dream, we build, we relax, we have some fun…rinse and repeat.

Let’s RETREAT!

Navi began with a purpose and a dream for that purpose and each year we have set aside time to revisit those dreams. It’s a practice that has kept us creating beyond the often illusive nature of inspiration, it has kept us disciplined and it has kept us honest. 2019 hasn’t been an easy year thus far, choosing to focus on the harvest has proven to be heartbreaking and dream threatening at times; it’s a bit of a gut check to know how hard you work and then to not always see that work grow into what you dreamt it might. BUT when you don’t get the harvest you were expecting, the responsible farmer doesn’t sell the farm, they simply examine their process and try again.

So, its back to our lovely retreat in Kinloch. A place where we face one another and we face our future. A place where we heal in hot mineral pools and energize ourselves through play. What will the rest of 2019 hold for Navi? What are our dreams for 2020? How will we build and grow? These are the questions that our annual retreat gives us time to answer. Our harvest hasn’t proven to be as abundant as we had hoped but we’re not selling the farm, we’re just going to figure out how to plant and grow better!

In this time of dreaming and building we hold two things to be certain: we want our collaborations to continue to include artists outside of our small family and we will be community facing. We are here to hear from you, to meet and work with the artists of Auckland, so please reach out. We see you. We want to know you. We want to create with you.

-Dawn

Baptism By Fire: A Directors View

Baptism By Fire: A Directors View

A couple of weekends ago I got to co-write and co-direct a film for the first time. It has been a dream of mine for quite a while now, and I am so grateful with my tiny experience that Navi gave me the chance to do it.

And yes it was just for 48 hours, but also it was for 48HOURS! As in the first time I try this, we have to get it all done and dusted over a weekend. That’s it. I have dubbed it my baptism by fire into the world of directing film. And IT. WAS. AWESOME. I am an actor by training, and am weekly in classes where I have to give feedback and watch the actors process a lot - so when it’s down to getting a good performance from an actor - especially the gorgeous Dawn Glover and Courtney Eggleton - I was in my element. But it was really all the camera stuff that was an eye-opener. I had opinions about shots and got into all sorts of compromising positions alongside my co-director Joshua Baty and our DOP Trajano Leydet - up on ladders so I could see the screen, down on the floor to get our overhead shot, and balancing on beds trying not to topple over on our lead actress.

The thing I love about performing arts, but especially film is that its a collaboration. And in this competition there is no room for ego, you are all there together, down in the trenches, trying to get the best result you can. And it’s full of long waits until you are wound up so tightly you are ready to spring into action than its go time. 

All in all it was a fantastic way to spend a weekend, especially when it’s with my creative family at Navi. You’d have thought we’d want to rip each others heads off by the end it, but instead its how I’d spend every weekend if I could. Bring on next year, you couldn’t keep me away!

- Prema Cottingham


48 Hours Later

48 Hours Later

Team work, 80’s ballads, larping gear, Flossing, Anime runs, more cans of V then we would like to admit, and all of our supporters….

is what it took to make this past weekend the success that it was. I don’t think I could feel prouder of our team or more grateful for our friends and collaborators then I do right now.

On Friday night at 7 pm Courtney and I (and the internet) found out our genre, and by the time C and I were back at our Head Quarters/set (Josh’s flat) our writers already has a solid idea in place. We did less then one hour of tweaking and off our writers (Josh and Prema Cottingham) went. By Saturday morning we were filming (with Trajano Leydet behind the camera) and we kept filming, all the way through 2 am Sunday morning. Editing started at 4 am Sunday morning (Di Davenport is a champ), and then at 15 minutes to the deadline C and I jumped in her car so that C could race us to the venue for the delivery of our completed film! We crossed the “finish line” at four minutes to 7. It was a fantastically fun weekend of “Furious Film Making.”

We have so many people to thank:

The Flatties at 55 Waiohua rd, Di and Josh’s employer, Prema Cottingham, Di Davenport, Mario Hernandez, Joy Lee, Trajano Leydet, Steven Logan, Philip Nannestad, Ian Pearce, Emilie Rousseau, Kacie Stetson, and the stray cat that we named “Medusa.”

Most of all we have to thank all of you who donated to our most recent Boosted Campaign. Your donations not only helped us bring (on) WHATIPU to life, they also helped us cover the near $500.00 that it cost to make this weekend and our short film happen. At the end of every Navi creative day, you guys are our hero’s.

We will find out in the near future how we did and we can’t wait to tell you more about our little film. Regardless of if we place or win anything I am chuffed, not with just the fact that we made a solid first effort film to compete with, but that we did it respecting and loving one another all the way through. There was no drama on our set, there were no let downs, just a group of people showing up with all of their talent and love and patience to make some art; may we always work like we did this weekend.

-Dawn

And....FILM!

And....FILM!

Apparently we’re going to get FURIOUS…

“Furious Filmmaking” here we come! After five years of wanting to “do film” and collaborating with a few awesome film makers to create trailers and media bits for different theatre projects, we have finally put our money where our mouth is and entered the 48HOURS Film Festival. Our team plus a few artists that we have been dying to work with are joining forces for a weekend of short film creating and it feels exciting to be anticipating new territory.

Just this past weekend some of our Navi Fam gathered for snacks and a screening of 48HOURS films that have won or placed in the past and it was inspiriting, intimidating, and encouraging all in one go. There are some seriously talented artist here in New Zealand (though Tall Poppy Syndrome often keeps that under wraps) and we know that no matter how our first short film turns out we are going to learn a lot and be in some great company. Who knows maybe this Festival will crack open a whole new passion for Navi…or maybe it will make us decide to just stick with theatre…

For more details on the 48HOURS Film Fest follow this link, and please, wish us luck!

https://www.48hours.co.nz/

-Dawn

CoasterSpeak For The Creative

CoasterSpeak For The Creative

This roller coaster was conceived by me, myself, and I.

Of this rollercoaster I am the architect, controller, and rider all at the same time. It’s climbs and drops, twists, turns, and array of loops are all my doing. If this rollercoaster had a name it would be called: Dawn’s Death Defying Relationship With The Opinions of Others (it’s a long name, I know), for short I’ll call it “The Opinions.”

I ride my latest version of “The Opinions” every time I finish a show. I ride it ad nauseam when the show I finish is an original of mine. I have been riding “The Opinions” ever since (on) WHATIPU closed. This particular coaster has an amazing Lift Hill. That climb was built by the process of the show, a process that I will always cherish. A process that was full of generosity and collaboration, that was inclusive and egoless; a gift. I climbed high on that process.

This rollercoaster also has quite the anticipation factor, the hang before that First Drop, that suspension in time that I refer to as “The Production.” It’s such a vulnerable and charged space. It’s full of the adrenaline of performing, that precarious safety of living the show, breathing it, doing your best to savor and honor the process that brought you to that performance pinnacle; and in anxiety raising contrast it is also the space in which you wonder about the responses. The space in which you are forced to consider the impact (or lack thereof) of your work each night, in real time, as you watch the audience leave; as your friends hug you hard or can’t meet your eyes…after that final bow on that final night you enter, I enter, the Free Fall. However, bare in mind that “The Opinions” was build in memorandum to an original work and so watch out! There isn’t just a Free Fall but also a Double Down Drop. After being on many of my coasters I know to expect it but that doesn’t mean I manage to keep my heart out of my throat or off my sleeve.

As for the rest of this coaster: the Banks (the reviews), the Barrel Rolls (the feedback/conversations), Bunny Hops (avoided conversations), Corkscrews (“suggestions”), Heartline Rolls (self-doubt), Helix’s (post-show career assessment), Immelmann Rolls (artistic existential crises), Inversions (getting offended/choosing to not take offense), and Turnarounds (complete assessment and inventory of how I do things and the agonizing examination of process vs product)…well it all comes at me with an impressive self generated G-force that keeps me securely trapped in my seat wondering when I will allow this particular ride to arrive at the Dead Spot.

It’s a harrowing ride and I won’t ask you to bare it with me for long, but I want to share that in the past week and some days I have been stuck at the Turnaround. I can’t work out if there is something to learn from the opinions of others in regards to: myself as an artist, to how Navi does things, to what kind of theatre and community that I crave to be involved with, or if I should just listen to my own damn gut on all of this. Does “Dawn’s Death Defying Relationship With The Opinions of Others” exist because I don’t trust myself as an artist- If so, why don’t I? Because I have internalized the criticism that I am too self-involved to create rides that others will appreciate- is there evidence to this? Because I’ve given my peers more authority then I give myself- why don’t I back myself? Because I perversely practice humbleness by valuing other practitioners voices more the mine? Or does it exist because somewhere deep inside of me I recognize the need for the opportunity to hear myself scream and whoop and yell and holler above the mob like buzz of those making their way to their own rollercoasters? If I just ride the ride for what it is will I finally hit the Dead Spot and exit exhilarated and relieved? What does it cost me, will it cost me, to just ride once and move on to my own Death Defying Opinions?

-Dawn

https://www.tripsavvy.com/roller-coaster-terms-a-to-d-3224464

Boost Navi 2019!

Boost Navi 2019!

When I think about all that our friends, families, and fans have helped us accomplish over the last five years I honestly always get a bit choked up. Your giving spirits always leave me humbled in the best way.

Your generosity has allowed us to make art that has explored the human experience; from depression to the intricacies of communication and back again. Your support has allowed us to pay stipends to at least 20 actors and provide professional opportunities to visual artists, film makers, theatre designers and operators, musicians, and photographers. By investing in us you have made it possible for us to share our earnings with important local charities and to hold open workshops and rehearsals for our communities and local schools. In short your donations have allowed us to chase fulfillment, change landscapes, cultivate our passions, and this year as we focus on our harvest we know that we won’t standing in abundance without all of you.

All this to say that It is time for our annual Boosted campaign. This year your donation will help us fund our current project (on) WHATIPU and lay a financial foundation for developing new works over the course of this year. We know that economically times are tough which is why we want you to know that your donation, no matter how small, will be exactly what we need and we promise that it will go a long way.

With love and gratitude,

Dawn and The Navi Team

https://www.boosted.org.nz/projects/on-whatipu

Navi 2019: HARVEST!

Navi 2019: HARVEST!

Expecting abundance isn’t something that most of us in the arts have been taught to do, but why shouldn’t we?

In 2007 I auditioned with well over a thousand other actors for different universities across the United States and abroad. We hopeful grad students and a large number of prominent universities had gathered in one hotel in Chicago to take a chance on our collective futures. I remember the rush and the adrenaline of being in that space and time and I also vividly recall the first thing that the administrators of the event said to us: “if you can see your self being happy doing anything else with your life, go do that. A life in the arts is full of hardship.” I remember being decidedly undeterred at the time, but those words and the many similar utterances of them that I heard throughout the theatrical journeys of my 20’s did stick with me; I recently realized that they shaped a very negative view of my expectations of a fulfilling life in the arts.

This year myself and the rest of the Navi team have decided to call “BULLSHIT” on that train of thought! Why is it that in every other career that you can get a college education for your are taught to expect success, but in the arts you are taught to be prepared for and hope for a stroke of luck. Sure, every life endeavor has it’s share of hardships and moments of inadequate compensation, but in no other field have I seen such a blatant acceptance of futility. I for one do not believe that living out your passion begets futility, I believe that living out your passions begets abundance, and so this year I am choosing to believe that the heart and work that we (Navi) put into cultivating our ethos and our projects in 2018 is going to pay off in a full artistic harvest in 2019. I hope that you will believe in that too. I hope that you will not hesitate to receive your mighty harvest from the universe just because we have been told to expect only hardship. I hope that when you receive your artistic harvest you will not chalk it up to luck but acknowledge the effort that you put into growing the creative life that you want.

Here’s to an abundant harvest in 2019!

2018 Over in a flash!

2018 Over in a flash!

OUR FIRST PROJECT OF 2018 CAME AND WENT IN AN ABSOLUTE FLASH. COMPLETE AND UTTER GRATITUDE TO OUR AUDIENCES, SUPPORTERS AND THE REST OF THE NAVI TEAM FOR MAKING IT ALL POSSIBLE.


Precious Little was an exhilarating ride for all involved. Stumbling upon the script in 2016, it stood out as a play that needed to be on a New Zealand stage. I was so thrilled to be able to pitch the project to Navi in October 2017 for a 2018 winter season. Originally set in America the play had themes that were equally relevant to Aotearoa: how our own voice goes through nature and nurture submerging in a melting pot of linguistics and language reforming whenever we try to connect with those around us. It also addressed the voice without words and how the body communicates when the voice can’t. Precious Little is universal, allying with and empowering those with disabilities, focusing on interconnectedness we all have as living creatures. Aotearoa also lends itself to the strong connection with animals and the earth and was pertinent to our show that focused around the unlikely friendship between a linguist and a Gorilla.

Guerilla ‘Gorilla’ Marketing

Spreading the word about our show made for a seriously wild time. Dawn had the most amazing ideas of how we would market PL and I am endlessly thankful for her incredible work that she put into this show. Word of the Day was a particular favourite of mine - little 10 second daily videos with a new, interesting word to get people excited about language! As a linguist myself I love words, definitions, etymology and communicating all of those things to a wider audience which made WOTD a perfect little task for me to undertake leading up to the show.

Our opening night, second to last and closing night, were sold out houses and the space was delightfully energised with roars of laughter and collective intakes of breath. As producer of Precious Little I am entirely indebted to our strong, supportive and amazing team as well as the Basement Theatre for hosting us. Behind every successful show is an incredible team and we were certainly fortunate enough to play on our strengths over the winter.

As I sit here typing, I am overwhelmed with the love I have for each and every member of the Navi team as well as the cast and crew that specifically came onboard for this project. They all worked so hard to get Precious Little to the Basement Theatre and I’m so grateful for their support, love and strength through the unavoidable ups and downs of a show process - particularly the stress of production week! With each project we learn and we grow. We cultivate our passions and I am beyond excited to continue working with this incredibly inspiring team. People say it takes a village to raise a child and I couldn’t think of better team to have helped raise my creative baby.

Courtney Eggleton



Cultivating Isn't For The Faint Hearted

Cultivating Isn't For The Faint Hearted

Gardens are beautiful things. Flower gardens for obvious reasons, and vegetable gardens because there is a lot of promise in them. Promise of a full stomach. Promise of healthy eating. When I walk through a garden or a well curated field of grains or corn I often forget about the sweat and even blood that probably went into the cultivation of that particular harvest. Cultivating, Nurturing, these words bring a certain gentleness to my mind. I think of ladies in sun hats dropping seeds from colorful envelops into mounds of rich dark soil, or of farmers walking through their rows of corn, relaxed with a long piece of grass between their teeth. I think of mothers nursing....but these images are only a part of the reality of what it is to grow, cultivate and nurture. 

So often it's a trial, a struggle to bring about healthy flowers or a bountiful harvest. So many factors have to line up. You have to have the right soil. You have to have enough rain or the appropriate irrigation systems. The weather has to be on your side. You have to make sure that you can keep the bugs and the birds out of it, and the seed, THE SEEDS, they have to germinate. When you are cultivating you have to dig deep, work hard, sweat a lot, and have faith that all of your hard work will pay off while you struggle against or try to get along with the elements, the unanticipated that you have very little control over. Gardening/Farming...it isn't for the faint hearted and neither is the world of theatre, of art. 

When I envisioned a year of cultivating and nurturing for Navi I had in mind this gentle year, but we are trying to cultivate something fulfilling and substantial and of course it isn't going to be easy. I just have to have faith in the harvest. I have to imagine what all of this digging in the soil will eventually lead to. I have to hold onto the promise of what we (Navi) are cultivating.

-Dawn 

 

 

Auditions POV

Auditions POV

Navi Collaborative believes that auditioning is an integral process in a healthy theatre scene. With this belief firmly in place we hold auditions for each and every project that we have. Most recently we held auditions for our upcoming production of Precious Little. Core member, Courtney Eggleton, took some time to sit down and pen out some of her thoughts on the experience from behind the casting table.

"This was the second time I’d sat on the other side of the audition table and it’s amazing to me how much I was fighting for each and every auditionee. Usually when I’m the one auditioning I am so scared, “what if I mess it all up?”, “what if I’m not good enough?”, “what if I forget my lines?”, “what if they just don’t like me” etc.… I was beyond impressed with each woman that came through our audition room door. Each was prepared, confident and talented. Casting our show was certainly not an easy task and I only wished we were casting a show for ten women not three.

We opened our auditions to the masses and were inundated with responses, specifically for our character in her 40s. I was pleasantly surprised with the amount of talent coming through and the passion they all shared for language. Come audition day we had a few pull out but the remaining women were astonishing.  It can be such a frightening experience stepping in front of a panel and these women did not disappoint us. They brought their expertise, strong choices and enthusiasm with them.

I found myself fighting for all of the auditionees. There was something so special about all of them that the overall casting decision seemed impossible. Through much discussion between the team we decided that we would cancel our callback auditions as we were confident that we could cast the show from this initial round. We had tossed up the idea that we would pit possible A’s against possible B’s. What we discovered through this process was that we had clear winners in our heads and felt as if we’d be wasting people’s time if it felt this clear here and now. So we slept on it. We woke up and we were still feeling the same.

From finding the play in 2016, pitching it to Navi in 2017, and auditioning in 2018, I have found such joy in women supporting and empowering other women.

·     Madeleine George, the playwright, is a talented and acclaimed American writer. I am thrilled to be bringing her work to New Zealand shores.

·      The Navi team currently consists of four core wonderful women and I am so thankful for their guidance and encouragement

·      Our director, Patricia Wichman, is a wonderfully talented and warm-hearted individual that slots so beautifully into our team. I am thrilled to be working with her and

With this team of warrior women behind it, Precious Little, will be a force to be seen, you definitely won’t want to miss out!

ALSO, we’re happy to announce that Catherine Maunsell has been cast in the role of A (Ape, Dorothy, Cleva and Baby) and Jessi Williams in the role of B (Sarah Brodie)."

-Courtney Eggleton

 

2018!

2018!

Welcome to Navi's 2018!

We named 2017 for change and boy did we see it! There were changes in the Navi core, changes in our audience reach, and changes in the world around us. We found ourselves changing personally and socially and while much of that change was rewarding, none of it came easy. Navi left 2017 excited but exhausted from a year of eruptions, and now here we are.

In 2018 we are looking to cultivate and nurture our passions, ourselves, our communities, and the culture that we want to create. We are putting on our metaphorical gardening gloves and getting into the soil that a year of eruption and change produced to make sure that in 2018 we grow the things that we want to see in ourselves and in the world. We are so excited about the work that we are producing and developing this year and about the plans that we have made to cultivate more collaboration. 

We hope we will see you at auditions, at our workshops, at our shows, and at other events in the theatre community. Come get amongst Navi and #CultivateYourPassion. 

 

Make 'Em Think

Make 'Em Think

As the lights faded to black they just sat there, still - it was a really special moment, because until that moment I didn't know that THAT was what I was trying to achieve.

The final night of Balls at my hometown theater was nothing less than an emotional roller coaster. The energy of the final night, the feeling of relief that we had pulled it off, the sadness that it was finishing... The Lads (and the lady) really did the show credit and brought it to life and I was so proud of all of us. 

But the best moment for me actually came after the final scene. Three of the people who sat next to me (two of which I knew) just sat there, they didn't move; even after everyone had exited into the foyer, they were still in their seats. I dared not move (as I was sitting pretty much in the middle), but then finally one of them spoke, it was actually the person I didn't know and it was question after question, How did you come up with that? How long did it take you to write? Each answer usually prompting another question. 

Now look, I don't want to sound pretentious. I'm just a kiwi boy from South Auckland - but the fact that something I wrote made somebody sit there stunned, thinking over and over about what they had just seen was pretty cool; in fact it was awesome and until that moment I didn't even know that that was what I was trying to achieve. But of course, I wanted to create a story that not only entertains but also makes you think. I love engaging with stories myself, and It was such a privilege to give that experience to others. 

So now it's all over, what happens next? I know I would love to take the show on the road, tour it around Aotearoa because Balls is more than a South Auckland story,  it is a New Zealand story and  it is (for better and for worse) part of our entire country's culture. In a recent New Zealand Rugby investigation 36 cases of misconduct were sited in the past four years. These included: "incidents involving inappropriate sexual behaviour, violent behaviour towards team members or coaches, drug and alcohol offenses and homophobic slurs." These sitings show that "Balls" hit the nail on the head with it's interpretation of this part of who we are, and I'm sorry, but it's ugly! I love rugby, I've said that continually throughout that process - growing up me and my Dad really bonded over this beautiful game, and he taught me everything I know about it - but he also taught me to be kind, honest and real. 

-Joshua Baty

Link to the New Zealand Rugby Investigation:

 http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/sport/338899/nz-rugby-culture-review-findings-released

 

Making Navi History!

Making Navi History!

Last evening (the 6th of Sep) we opened our play, Balls, for the second time in two years. And what an opening it was! I felt such gratitude and pride as I watched Josh lock up the Off-Broadway theatre a long while after the last member of the audience has departed. 

Balls, in the world of Navi, is a "Toddler Project."  In 2016 it became the second company created piece, and this year is has officially become the first show in what will eventually be our Navi "Catalogue." Over the past two months Josh has taken the first full length play that he has written and made it his first show to direct, and I think for a first time Director (with no official training in the art of Directing) he did a damn fine job. 

Last night was also history making for Navi, as we had the largest opening night audience in our young Collaborative's life. The energy in the space was delicious and invigorating. I was thrilled to hear the roar of laughter and the sharp intakes of breath as the show moved from one beat to another. 

As our Navi Team sat in the theatre afterwards I felt so much love for each of our members. Each member of Navi has worked hard to get Balls to Papakura and what's more we did it while loving and supporting one another through all of the inevitable ups and downs of a show process. We still don't have everything down perfectly, but we are growing. I can see our growth and it that makes me feel joyful and inspired to keep going and revealing what our Collab, our creative family, can do

-Dawn

 

 

 

 

NAVI GOES BLUE!

NAVI GOES BLUE!

With each of our projects Navi seeks out a way that we can give to our community through supporting local groups that make a difference in the lives of Kiwi's. We show our support through both donations and by raising awareness around various organizations and the important work that they do. 

Blue September estimates that 600 Kiwi men a year loose their lives to Prostate Cancer largely because they were unaware of what to watch out for and didn't receive their diagnosis until it was too late. This September we are using our production of Balls to raise funds (for Blue September) and awareness by having a BLUE DO! Come along to our show on the 9th of September and a percentage of your ticket purchase will go to life saving education about and around Prostate Cancer. We also encourage everyone who attends on the 9th to wear Blue. Each member of the audience wearing Blue will be eligible to go into a draw to win double passes to all Navi projects in 2018. There will also be special treats (and fingers crossed) a special guest speaker to lead a small Talk Back about Prostate Cancer after the show. 

We hope you will partner with us in saving lives. We hope to see you at our BLUE DO!

-Navi

 

 

IT'S OFFICIAL!!!

IT'S OFFICIAL!!!

Go and see BALLS whether you love rugby or hate it. -Nikau Hindin

In 2016 Navi premiered Joshua Baty's, first play Balls, as part of Te Pou's Rangatahi Season. The play was given great reviews and we have had it in our minds to give Balls another season in 2017. Just this week Papakura Theatre Company has granted us a five show run in Aug/Sep of this year!

We are over the moon to have this opportunity, and it wouldn't be possible for us to remount this "raw and totally South Auckland" play if it weren't for the recent success of our Boosted Campaign. By supporting our production of The Snot-Gobbler you have helped us build a financial foundation that will allow us to bring Balls, to Papakura. Thank you! 

Our Boosted campaign is in it's last couple of days, and though we have reached our goal, every dollar over will allow us to do more then this year then we had even imagined. If you would like to support us beyond The Snot-Gobbler then please hit the button below and #FundTheMagic.

 

 

 

Joshua Baty & #ChangeTheLandscape

Joshua Baty & #ChangeTheLandscape

We are just 7 days out from the end of our Boosted Campaign!

How will you be helping us "Change The Landscape," by donating to The Snot-Gobbler? Your support will allow us to:

  • Present a strong female hero
  • Present a strong and "older" female sidekick
  • Broach the topic of grief and loss in a way that is accessible to children; who will experience these things at some point int their lives and often while they are young.
  • Provide a performance for children with special and specific needs.
  • Sale our tickets at a rate that is "doable" for a wider range of of families.
  • Give a free workshop that will encourage the creativity and imagination of the children who attend.
  • Get closer to our goal of paying artist at a rate that reflects the value of their work. 

These are just a few of our goals as Navi, and if these are things that you can get behind, then please consider helping The Snot-Gobbler become a fully funded project. 

 

 

 

To Our Family & Friends

To Our Family & Friends

As you probably know by now, Nicci Reuben is the creator of The Snot-Gobbler. We (as Navi) are so proud of her and this magical story that she has imagineered into life along with her partner, Ross Goffin. 

We know that we have spent the last month asking our family and friends for money, and please believe us when we say that doing a fundraiser is one of the most intense and humbling experiences you can have; I think we all know that having to ask someone for money, even family, is often awkward at best. But at the end of the day, we need our family and friends to achieve our dreams, and not just monetarily, we need you to see our work, we need to know that we can use our creative side and successfully communicate with it to those the we love and respect. I can't really say any of this better then Nicci has in her video, so I hope that you will give it a watch and that you will consider helping us #FundTheMagic. We only have one week left to reach our funding goal.

The Bravest Big Sister Around

The Bravest Big Sister Around

This week we have been talking about our Hero, Rosie Petal!

Rosie (played by Dawn Glover) is a nine year old girl who has already come face to face with some huge tragedy. Her big brother, and at that point favorite person in the world, Henry was killed in a car accident when she was seven. This of course sent her family reeling, but the Petal's chose to navigate through their grief by remembering Henry with love and by caring for one another even more then they had before. It wasn't too long before Jasper was born and Rosie went from having been a little sister to being a big sister and she is determined to be the best big sister possible! She is also doubly fierce in her protection of Jasper's smile because her mother's smile hasn't been seen much since Jasper was born, and though Rosie isn't quite sure what's happening with her mother she has a feeling it has to do with Henry, whom she notices her parents speak of less and less. When Jasper's smile is swiped by The Snot-Gobbler Rosie knows that she has to go and get it back! However, Rosie is a bit scared of Gotten-Gitten Von Schnauzelburger and his old creepy house. With some encouragement from her newly discovered sidekick, Tarantula, Rosie learns that being brave isn't about not being afraid, but that bravery is an act of facing fear head on. 

We are so excited to bring Rosie's story to the stage and thrilled to announce that our community focus for our premiere season of The Snot-Gobbler is The Grief Centre. Since each of our four characters are dealing with some form of loss we felt that our production of The Snot-Gobbler provides us with a great opportunity to give support and appreciation to an organization that helps people navigate grief on a day to day basis. We have committed to giving the Grief Centre 10% of the ticket sales from one of our productions but we would love to do more. If we are able to reach our Boosted funding goals we would be able to offer a bigger donation to The Grief Centre. If you would like to partner with us in supporting The Grief Centre and help us #FundTheMagic please click below.